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Tuesday, 5 July 2016

Kitchen Treasures From Ho Yan Hor Museum, Ipoh.

Today I am sharing more snapshots of old treasures from the Ho Yan Hor museum. These shots were taken from the kitchen. If you have missed the 1st post on Ho Yan Hor museum, you can click here to read the post. There will be more treasures in future posts.
Herbs drying at the new factory.
Those are rattan trays surrounding the picture.
Antique iron for ironing clothes. I used one of this when I was a young girl. Burning charcoal is placed inside the iron and every on and then, the iron needed to be take outside to be fanned to remove the excess ashes and to keep the coal burning.
An old ironing board on a wooden stand.
A straw hat and a dishes drying stand over a dish washing basin.
Some very old items from yester-years.
Do you recognise any of these old items?
Some of these are familiar, some are not.
I only recognised the Sunlight soap.

Make a tree good and its fruit will be good,

or make a tree bad and its fruit will be bad,

for a tree is recognized by its fruit.

(Matthew 12:33, New International Version-NIV)
These are wooden moulds for making nyonya kueh or sweet cakes.
1924 Tea Caddies on the top shelf and plastic moulds for jelly on lower shelf.
Old fashioned flasks. I had one that looked something like the one on the left but I must have given it away.

Linking to Tuesday's Treasures.

46 comments:

  1. Goodness that's a lot of trays for the herb drying. I wonder what they do if it rains or gets windy. I remember my Mum telling me that she remembers her Mum using one of those irons. I've seen them used as weights placed in front of open doors to stop the wind blowing them shut.

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    1. That was how we used to dry things too, in the open sun. We have to constantly watch the sky. We may have to lose some if it gets windy. The old iron makes good weight because it is very heavy.

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  2. Now you showed me already, I don't have to go there.. :) Thanks!

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    1. I can only show you some but not all the items. Maybe you can take your friends and visitors who may be interested.

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  3. So much to see. I love looking through antiques. I have one old iron. I blogged it before. ;)

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    1. We no longer have the old iron with us now. Would make a good decoration piece.

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  4. Uma maravilha estes pormenores do museu.
    Um abraço e boa semana.
    Andarilhar

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Francisco. Have a beautiful day!

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  5. Replies
    1. You are most welcome, Sharon. Have a good day!

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  6. Your pics brings back memories :)

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    1. Yes, that is why I love visiting and looking through these old treasures.

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  7. Gosh so much work to iron clothes at the time! I already don't like ironing with modern irons hehe.

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    1. I too do not enjoy ironing! I will be sweating away, ha ha!

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  8. What a wonderful collection, loved the old iron and ironing board. I did recognise some of the items. A great post.

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    1. Thank you, Mamas. I am still using an ironing like this one, except that it is a metal stand.

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  9. What a wonderful collection of vintage items Nancy. Some are the same as I would see here, while are new to me. Thanks for your visit to Tuesday's Treasures, have a great day and please stop back again.

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    1. Thank you, Tom. Some of the items were before my time and they are totally new to me. Have a great day!

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  10. Rather intriguing and some of those names are certainly familiar to me..

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    1. Thank you, Margaret. Some are familiar to me, some are not.

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  11. Replies
    1. Thank you, Tamar. Have a lovely day!

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  12. These are fun Nancy. In one of the photos you a metal bottle of Brasso. I remember my mother had one of these under our kitchen sink for years when I was a kid. She probably bought it once and then it sat there, never being used. What a fun memory to bring back. Happy July! Hugs-Erika

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    1. Thank you, Erika. I have seen Brasso before but didn't know what it was for.

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  13. Super antiques! Greetings! :))

    xxBasia
    http://kasztanowydomek.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. Thank you, dear. Have a wonderful day!

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  14. History rocks. Things were so much more difficult to do back in the day. Automation has made many things much easier.

    Have a fabulous day Nancy. ☺

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    1. Thank you, Sandee. So grateful for our modern automation. Have a great day!

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  15. Wow, you used the antique iron before! Must be a pain to use it. Happy Holidays! but then again everyday is a holiday for you, right? ;p

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    1. Yes, I was not even tall enough to iron on the table. I have to stand on a short wooden stool. The iron was quite heavy. Every now and then I have to take the iron outside, fan away the ash and take it back in to continue ironing. Very troublesome. Ha ha everyday is a holiday!

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  16. What fun to see all the vintage items! I hope you are having a great week, Nancy. :)

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    1. Thank you, Linda. It was great and I hope you too are having a great week too!

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  17. Fascinating to see all these old items!

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    1. Thank you, William. Have a beautiful day!

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  18. Yes, I do recognize the Oxydol, Colgate, Palmolive, Brillo, and Lifebuoy! Some of these are still sold here, but in more modern packages. That iron must weigh a ton. Gosh, how did women do it back then?

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    1. The iron is quite heavy and I did use it when I was a young girl. I guess women those days were stronger. Lol!

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  19. Looking at all these antique objects, especially the ironing board with the big hole, I wonder how many interesting stories they can tell!

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    1. If only these objects can talk. They will definitely tell us lots of interesting stories about the family.

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  20. Really interesting post...thx for sharing! xx

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    1. Thank you, Beauty. Have a lovely day!

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  21. Hi Nancy,
    Thanks for sharing these treasures. Hardly could find them in the modern households now.

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    1. Most household have given away the old treasures in exchange for modern ones.

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  22. Good to see these things preserved.

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  23. Wow. Great photos of a part of history. Fantastic.

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  24. Thank you, Anne. Have a great day!

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Thank you for your visits and encouraging comments. They are greatly appreciated. Have a beautiful day.

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