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Tuesday, 6 August 2019

Life By The Yellow River In Ancient China

Today's post is about "Life by the Yellow River in Ancient China. You can click here and here to visit the previous posts of our visit to the Miniature Wonders Art Gallery in Ipoh old town.

The Yellow River is the 2nd longest river in China. Its basin was the birthplace of ancient China and it was the most prosperous region in the early Chinese history (info taken from Wikipedia).
The miniature display is worth seeing with your own eyes and you only need to pay RM 5, go up the stairs and take your time to see the amazing hand craft display and also to take pictures.
Information on the wall as we walked up the stairs.
Using a mixture of pure flour and water dough to make the figurines.
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Here starts the "Life by the Yellow River in Ancient China".
Sit back and enjoy the pictures.
Simple houses and mode of transportation
Rearing of pigs.
Drying of grains.
Loading and unloading of goods by the Yellow River.
Why is the Yellow River is so yellow? It is due to the large amount of yellow wind borne clay dust called loess sediment giving it a yellow appearance.
Buildings such as tea houses can be found on the river bank.
The boats and buildings were made with such details.
Workers carrying bags of grain on their shoulders.
Man-powered boats

Eateries or tea houses on river bank in ancient China.
A bridge over the Yellow River.
Lots of activities on and near the bridge

Selling and buying on both sides of the river near the bridge





Rice/grain field and a traditional vehicle (sedan chair) in ancient China.
Activities on the river bank




2 storey tea house

Buildings nearer to the city in ancient China.
Outside the city gate
Outside the city gate
Outside the city gate
People going in and out of the city gate.


Can't you hear the voice of wisdom?
She is standing at the city gates and at every fork in the road,
and at the door of every house.
Listen to what she says: "Listen, men! she call.
"How foolish and naive you are! Let me give you understanding.
O foolish ones, let me show you common sense!
(Proverbs 8:1-5, The Living Bible-TLB)

46 comments:

  1. İnteresting places 😊 thanks for your sharing Nancy 😊

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  2. it must take a lot of patience to form these delicate miniature!

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    1. Yes, so delicate and I marvel at the people's talent and creativity.

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  3. It is like i have went for a tour to ancient china myself, thanks for sharing

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  4. I find it very interesting,love history☺

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  5. wow such a great lesson of China history my dear- excellent pictures

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  6. I love the miniatures. They really do give a unique perspective of Chinese history.

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  7. It's truly amazing how the artisans made these miniatures with such detail. Such skill and patience!

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  8. ...an amazing amount of work when into creating these miniature pieces of history. What patience was needed, thanks Nancy for sharing these treasures. I hope that you are enjoy your week.

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    1. Thank you, Tom. Hope you have a good week too!

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  9. Nancy, this was a very interesting and amazing bit of history. Tremendous work had to be to be done to complete this. I totally enjoyed this. See ya.

    Cruisin Paul

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  10. My goodness, what a lot of work has gone into creating all this history. Thanks so much for sharing, it is very educational. Keep well Diane

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  11. Way cool. I would have loved to have gone with you. History is a wonderful thing to explore.

    Thank you for joining the Happy Tuesday Blog Hop.

    Have a fabulous Happy Tuesday, Nancy. ♥

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    1. Thank you, Sandee. I am glad to have a friend who is interested to accompany me to this exhibition.

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  12. These are just wonderful, and I have had a huge smile on my face the whole time. I do wish I could see them in person, but this is the next best thing. My favorite is the very first one. I wonder how long they will last, being flour and water?

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    1. Thank you, Ginny. I too wonder how the flour and water dough could last so long.

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  13. That's amazing! Such craftsmanship!
    Thanks for linking up at https://image-in-ing.blogspot.com/2019/08/mmmmmmm.html

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  14. Those are so fascinating, i would love to take a tour in person and learn about life long ago.

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    1. Thank you, Mimi. It was time well spent looking at these exhibits.

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  15. That is pretty amazing!! Such detail and craftsmanship, and so much work to put it all together.
    And of course, you always have a great verse to go with it.

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  16. Stunning exhibition! Thousands of work hours needed to produce all the details. Amazing.

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    1. Thank you, Riitta. Really amazing and I am glad I got to see with my own eyes the exhibits.

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  17. Me encanta, es precioso. Besitos.

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  18. Thank you for showing us so many photos. very informative!

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  19. Worth the visit at just rm5.

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