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Tuesday, 30 July 2019

Terracotta Warriors - Miniature Wonders Art Gallery, Ipoh

This is the continuation of our visit to the Miniature Wonders Art Gallery. If you have missed the first post, you can click here to enjoy the pictures of "Life In Ancient China". To view the exhibits on the next level, we paid RM 5 per person.
 A chance to get an idea of how the Terracotta warriors were made.
The Terracotta army is a part of a massive burial tomb built for Emperor Qin Shi Huang, the first emperor of China. (From Wikipedia)
It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210-209 BCE with the purpose of protecting the emperor in his afterlife. The figures were discovered in 1974 by local farmers in Lintong County, outside Xi'an, Shaanxi, China. (From Wikipedia)
 Feasting and performance
Heavily guarded
 A close up view of sword fighting performance
Side view
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The making of Terracotta Warriors of China
Terracotta warriors were sculptured into shapes and dried slowly.
There are many huts on the scene to shade the figurines. 

These carts were used for transporting the figurines.
  
After having dried thoroughly, the figurines can be fired in the kiln to become ceramic terracotta warriors which can be permanently preserved.
 The sculptured figurines were ready to be fired in these kilns.







The terracotta warriors, weighing hundreds of kilos had to be transported to a depth of 6 to 7 meters deep pit. Ancient Qin people used small wood stick roll and long rope to sent it beveling down to the bottom of the pit.  
 The terracotta figures are life-sized and most held real weapons.
 The figures and their uniforms shows their different rank and positioned accordingly. The formation also includes terracotta horses.

  The first exhibition of the figures outside of China was held at National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne in 1982.
 This visit to the art gallery gave me an opportunity to see the miniature terracotta warriors without having to travel to China to see the actual ones.


Don't be impatient for the Lord to act!

Keep traveling steadily along his pathway and

in due season he will honor you with every blessing,

and you will see the wicked destroyed.

(Psalm 37:34, The Living Bible-TLB)

44 comments:

  1. Hello, thanks for the information. Have a nice day
    xx

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  2. Interesting to read that their first tour was to Melbourne because they are back at the National Gallery of Victoria until October 19....oh, I wish I could go!

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    1. Yes, it would be interesting to see the real thing in person.

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  3. I would love to see the actual ones, but would love to see these too. Lucky you.

    Have a fabulous day, Nancy. ♥

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    1. I would love to see the actual ones too but I happy to get to see these miniatures.

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  4. Interesting post my dear, thank you for sharing :-)

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  5. thanks for your photos! felt like I visited the miniature art gallery already!

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  6. Wow, these are just amazing. I have seen the real ones on T.V. The detail in these is just perfect, wish I could have seen them in person.

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    1. Thank you, Ginny. I think seeing these miniatures is nearly as good as the real ones.

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  7. The terracotta warriors have been on my bucket list to see for a number of years but I do not think now I will ever get to see them. Thanks for sharing this post and giving us all the info, Have a good day Diane

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    1. I know I don't have the chance to see the real ones so I am happy to see these miniatures.

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  8. While i knew about the warriors, i never knew how they were created. Fascinating, and so much work!

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    1. I am glad to see the miniatures and also get to know why they were created.

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  9. ...the terracotta-warriors have always fascinated me! The work that went into creating all of these objects and scenes is amazing. Nancy, thank you so much for sharing all these treasures, I hope that you are enjoying your weekend.

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    1. Thank you, Tom for hosting. Have a wonderful day!

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  10. Interesting! Guess it is the next best thing to being there.

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  11. I would enjoy looking at the terracotta. I have been to a terracotta exhibition before when they came to Kuching. Not kiniature but almost real sized thing. I dont remember what it was but a China show and exhibition. Mask changing show, acrobatic, terracotta exhibition and some stage show.

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    1. I don't have the chance to see the real thing so I am quite happy to see these miniatures and get an idea of how they were made.

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  12. one of the BEST POST dear Nancy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    thank you for taking along

    incredibly displayed figures and brilliantly captured by you :)

    how amazing to visit such magnificent place

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  13. I would love to see this in person as it is amazing

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  14. What a detailed description of the miniature wonders art gallery, thanks for sharing, it is really an eye opener for me.

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  15. What a great post and such wonderful photos. It is a great exhibition, I really enjoyed the tour with you.

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  16. These are amazing. Can you imagine the work that goes into creating these scenes?

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  17. Must look closely to appreciate the details.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, we took time to appreciate the details and try to imagine life at that time in China.

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