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Monday, 6 May 2019

Grow, Harvest & Cook Angled Luffa

With hubby's help, I am now more encouraged to grow more edibles, especially those that grow on vines. One day while at the plant nursery, I picked up a packet of angled luffa seeds. Hubby has prepared the place and the overhead lines for me to grow some climbing vegetables.
Angled Luffa vines growing out of a big pot.
Flower buds of the Luffa plants.
The plants have been flowering but whenever I check on them in the morning, the yellow flowers have dropped off from the plants.
Angled Luffa vines in front (on the right) and the white bitter melon vines further back (left).
One late evening, hubby called me out to the garden to see these Angled Luffa flowers. This picture was taken with the flash light.
If we happened to check on the plants in the early morning, the flowers are still intact and have not dropped off.
Pretty yellow Angled Luffa flowers.
This is the first Angled Luffa fruit hanging from the vine.
Happy to see lots of yellow flowers on the vines and the bees are busy going from flowers to flowers.
Hubby happily counting the numbers of angled luffa on the vines.
Here is another one.
Two more lower down.
This was found hiding behind the leaves.
The first Angled Luffa harvested from my garden. This is my first experience and I better it earlier to prevent it from growing too old.
When I cooked it, it turned out to be very tender and about the right time to be harvested. I cooked the Angled Luffa with garlic, ginger slices, prawns, chicken breast slices, century egg and salted egg.
I also fried a plate of rice vermicelli with chicken breast slices, beansprouts, julienned carrots, etc. Hubby and I had these 2 dishes for dinner that evening.
Harvested from my garden: long green okra, red okras and angled luffa. The 2 short and fat okras were given by a friend. She also gave me a few seeds and now I am waiting for the seeds to sprout.

Many say that God will never help us. Prove them wrong, O Lord,
by letting the light of your face shine down upon us.
Yes, the gladness you have given me is far greater than their joys
at harvest time as they gaze at their bountiful crops.
(Psalm 4:6-7, The Living Bible-TLB)

42 comments:

  1. Luffa is not a vegetable I know at all, interesting and it looks like you have plenty. Okra I do know but we do not see them in the shops very often here. Well done. you have a great garden Diane

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  2. I miss angled luffa! Used to have them every single summer days!

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    Replies
    1. Happy with my first try in growing Luffa.

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  3. I find this "LUFFA" very interesting and did not know this kind of vegetables yet, but Wikipedia told me that this is a pumpkin. The flowers are also very nice.

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    1. Thank you, Heidi. Luffa is soft and spongy.

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  4. Congratulations on the success of your angled loofah plant! How I wish I could plant these climbers in my garden.

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    1. Thank you, PH. Thanks to my hubby for helping in putting up the lines for the vines.

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  5. That is so interesting, I haven't tried this before! My tomatoes are growing nicely☺

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Natalia. I don't have success in growing tomatoes.

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  6. ...Angled Luffa are new to me!

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  7. Wow Nancy. I've never seen a Angled Luffa nor ever tasted one. This why I love your blog. Thanks my friend for showing me one. See ya.

    Cruisin Paul

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Paul. This is one of our local vegetables.

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  8. Sounds good and sure has a pretty flower! Enjoy your week sweet friend!

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  9. What a lovely meal and you've an amazing green thumb.

    Have a fabulous day and week, Nancy. ♥

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Sandee. Enjoying my retirement. Have a great week!

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  10. Wahhh... chui kai pak tong ah!! Kerjasama suami isteri!

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    Replies
    1. Better harvest working as a team and with an extra pair of hands.

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  11. I love to eat luffa and both your homecook dishes are so tasty. well done for growing them from seeds which I don't think is easy to achieve.

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    1. Thank you, Mun. I wasn't expecting much but now I am very happy with the harvest.

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  12. The fruits are huge! The leaves and flowers are so pretty that they can be grown as flowers even if there was no fruit. We do not have this here.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ginny. From now on, this will be growing in my garden.

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  13. I have never eaten angled luffa before, it is new to me, you have turned your harvest into very delicious meal

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    Replies
    1. I love to eat angled luffa. Luffa is now included in the menus of many restaurants, also in vegetarian menus.

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  14. lovely vegetable garden...

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  15. Fantastic plants and flowers :)

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  16. Your plants are beautiful, your meals look so good!

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  17. The flowers are pretty. I've never heard of luffa before.

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  18. Wow all kinds of shapes and sizes now. :)

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    Replies
    1. Trying to grow new vegetables for more varieties.

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  19. Me encanta que coseches tus propias verduras. Besitos.

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