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Thursday, 29 October 2020

Baked Cassava Root Cake & Boiled Cassava Root

I needed to harvest my cassava roots before they get over matured. I finally dug out all the cassava roots on afternoon.

I waited and when the sky turned cloudy, I started digging out the cassava roots.
Cassava roots harvested, washed and the skin peeled off. I kept aside a portion to make cassava cake or kuih ubi bingka and store the rest in the freezer for future use. I am thinking of making cassava sweet drink or tong sui and making cassava cake one more time.
To make kuih ubi bingka, I grated the cassava roots. Then I lightly squeezed out the water from the grated roots. Then I added sugar, coconut milk, melted butter and 2 eggs and mixed all together evenly.
Then I poured the mixture into baking trays oiled with melted butter. I baked the cassava cake in the oven for about 1 hour at 190 deg. C.
It smelled so good but the texture was not as soft as I desired it to be.
It tastes good and not too sweet.
The cassava cake was cut and packed to be distributed to my neighbour and friends.
Another way of cooking cassava roots is to boil them in some salt until they are soft and fluffy. This is another one of my favourite. Sometimes I eat it plain, sometimes with grated coconut. I can eat it for breakfast, lunch or dinner. 
Crape Jasmine flowers by the roadside in front of a row of terrace houses.

I was born to do wrong,

a sinner before I left my mother's womb.

You want me to be completely loyal,

so put true wisdom deep inside of me.

Remove my sin and make me pure.

Wash me until I am whiter than snow!

(Psalm 51:5-7, Easy-to-Read Version-ERV)

60 comments:

  1. Never heard of cassava plants, looked it up, interesting.
    Take care.

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  2. I've never heard about cassava root. The cake looks do delicious :)

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  3. Great post!This dish looks so yummy!
    beautyqueen000.blogspot.rs

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  4. I have never had fresh cassava. The cake sounds and looks really intriguing and tasty!

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    Replies
    1. You can even make cassava chips from the fresh cassava.

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  5. It's quite amazing to know what other food can be processed from cassava. Growing up and cassava been a popular food in Africa, I never knew it exists in Europe too.

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  6. cassava root cake is delicious.... love cassava roots.....
    we bought sometimes from Asian shops.

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    Replies
    1. We can get this cake from the local kuih stalls.

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  7. Amazing flowers and cool photos! Thank you very much for your interesting article! )

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  8. Our family has always liked cassava. Still like to be processed. In the middle, it is processed into Tiwul, fried, steamed or also made into various market snacks :)

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  9. I had to look cassava up, a new one on me. That reminds me though I must dig up some of our topinambour roots. Stay safe Diane

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    Replies
    1. I too looked up topinambour. It is new to me too.

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  10. I really need to check out jasmine plants. So pretty

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  11. I want some of that cake. Never heard of that kind of cake before.

    Have a fabulous day, Nancy. ♥

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  12. The cassava cake sounds like something I would like.

    that is a great sky shot.

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  13. I have never seen a recipe like this. We don't have cassava roots here.

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    Replies
    1. It is a tropical plant and it grows well here.

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  14. The Jasmine flowers must be very fragrant! I love to eat the steamed cassava and bingka ubi that you made. You are such a good cook, can make bingka ubi! So tasty! You made two trays of bingka ubi?

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    Replies
    1. Actually ubi bingka is easy to make. Grating it is hard work. I make it into 2 tray for fasting cooking time.

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  15. Replies
    1. Thank you, Gigi. It is a very useful plant.

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  16. Looks good. I have never eaten cassava kuih.

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    Replies
    1. It is also known as mook shu kueh or tapioca kueh.

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  17. This is a very different cake, one that I've never had. Can you put frosting on this cake?

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    Replies
    1. We don't put frosting on this cake. Anyway, I haven't tried it. Maybe it will taste nice. Lol!

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  18. Someday i would like to try your cassava cake!

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    Replies
    1. You are welcome to try, Mimi. Happy weekend.

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  19. My Mom used to make those cassava cakes too.
    Yours look yummy.

    Ann
    https://roomsofinspiration.blogspot.com/

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  20. Thank you for blessing me with these yummy desserts!

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  21. I dont think i have eaten cassava cake before, yours looks yummy.

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  22. Muy interesante todo. Besos.

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  23. So much work starting from digging up that cassava. The end products look worth the trouble.

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    Replies
    1. I have decided not to plant cassava again. Instead, whenever I want to eat, I can go to wet market to search for the cassava root. After all, can't eat much. Now that I have planted once, am satisfied.

      Delete

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