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Thursday, 14 May 2015

#2 - VISIT TO KINTA TIN MINING (GRAVEL PUMP) MUSEUM, KAMPAR

In yesterday's post I have shared some of the photos taken in the compound of the museum. Today I will be sharing some of the photos out of the many taken inside the museum. The museum is divided into 3 sections: the front and the back section and also the 1st floor section.

After having covered the compound area, we came to the entrance of the building that leads to the front section.
This striking red notice got my attention. Went near to read....

The hooked metal is used to hit on the cylindrical metal like a worker's siren to sound the time. The workers' tags are hung on the wooden board on the wall.

The ceramic drinking bowl is used for drinking water from the big earthen pot. Water stored in earthen pot are kept cool.

Wooden wheel barrow and wooden pails, etc. used by workers.
Life-sized models of male workers at work in the tin mine.

This is called "Pitting".

Manual separation for tin ore.

Stages of manual tin ore separation.


Fossilized tree trunk "THE STAR" 6500 year old.
Tools used by workers at the tin mine e.g. wrenches, spanners, etc.

Drills, axes and saws, etc.

Model of a mining site. Some photos do not turn out well because of the lighting and glass casing that reflected the light.

Model of palong at mining site.

Model of early sailing ships that brought Chinese workers to work in the tin mines. On both sides of photo are coats made from palm fiber.

On the left shows a tin mine worker and on the right worker cutting hair for fellow worker.

Photos of female workers doing the dulang washing for tin ore.

Model of early old fashioned tin ore dealer.

Model of tin ore dealer weighing the tin ore with a wooden hand weighing machine with weights called the Dacing.

Model of tin ore dealer calculating with a wooden abacus Chinese calculator.

Samples of tin ingots - these look like gold bars!

Model of kitchen and canteen at a tin mining site.

Model of female cook in the kitchen cooking for the tin mine workers.

Model of a tin mine kitchen.

Model of workers taking their meal in the kitchen/canteen. The ceramic bowls also served as drinking bowls.

Finally, at the end of our tour of the museum, there is a box requesting for free will donation for the maintenance of the museum.

Adam's one sin brought the penalty of death to many,

while Christ freely takes away many sins

and gives glorious life instead.

(Romans 5:16, The Living Bible-TLB)

50 comments:

  1. So interesting! Love that ceramic drinking bowl.
    Amalia
    xo

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    1. Amalia, we can still get this type of ceramic bowls in the crockery shops.

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  2. I went to a nearly similar exhibit here last time though not about mining :D Such an interesting but hard life .

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    Replies
    1. The early immigrants from China and etc. really had a hard life, many were killed by landslides in the mines.

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  3. This would be a good place for school-going kids. Can help bring the topic to life. Now why wasn't this around in MY time? :)

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    Replies
    1. Yes Stacy, visiting the museum and seeing with their own eyes will enable them to visualize and makes it easy to understand and remember. We didn't have this chance during our time.

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  4. Thanks for sharing your visit of the tin mine museum. Very interesting.
    Hugs,
    JB

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Julia. Have a great day.

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  5. So much interesting thing to see & learn from this museum. Guess you enjoy your visit as much as I do. Very informative post.

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    Replies
    1. Irene, I really enjoyed the visit. In face, I won't mind going again.

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  6. You gave us a great insight with your stroll around the museum.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, dear. Would love to share more but it will be a long post.

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  7. Wow, Nancy, thank you so much for sharing this fascinating tour!!!

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    Replies
    1. Linda, you are most welcome. Have a nice day!

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  8. I wonder why they put up the red notice. Thank you showing us everything inside.

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    Replies
    1. Mun, in fact there is so much more things to share but I have to choose just enough for the posting.

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  9. they really do well to illustrate the work involved! i like that chime/bell out front, too.

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    Replies
    1. I too think the chime/bell is very cute.

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  10. Thanks for showing these pictures. It is like reading the history through your pictures:)

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    Replies
    1. Joy, thank you. I am glad you enjoyed the tour.

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  11. I follow you,can you follow me back? Cool post :D


    lepotaodaleks.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex, thanks for visiting. Already followed you.

      Delete
  12. Interesting look at the old days. Plantations workers in Hawaii had tags with number also, called "Bango"





    ( '>
    /))
    //""

    ALOHA from Honolulu,
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^=

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cloudia, thanks for sharing about Bango. Have a nice day!

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  13. They have done this place so very well. They covered everything!! I don't know whether to feel sorry for the Chinese or happy that they had jobs. I guess it all depends how they were treated.

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    Replies
    1. In a way they get jobs but life was really tough for them.

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  14. very educational post thanks

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    1. Thank you, Gosia. Have a great day.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  15. Nice look!

    I follow you! :)
    kiss

    http://beautybeybi.blogspot.com.tr/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, dear. Have a nice day.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  16. What a fascinating place! Amazing that the cost was free will donations. T. http://tickledpinkwoman.blogspot.com

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    Replies
    1. Yes, and the donation is for maintenance. Have a good day.

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  17. Very interesting display,a have to visit next time i dropped by Kampar.

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    Replies
    1. Thomas, I hope you will enjoy the visit.

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  18. you know what...i think it would also be lovely if they have a short film like those petronas thingy film that shows how it works. After walking around the place the watch the film or vice versa then people will remember those things more

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    Replies
    1. Yes, yours is a great idea. I hope the management will get this idea or someone to suggest this to them.

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  19. What an informative and interesting post.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Ida. Have a lovely day.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  20. Replies
    1. You r most welcome. Have a nice day.

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  21. I admired seeing all the pictures taken inside the museum. All the pictures says something to us. Good shot!

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    Replies
    1. I too learned a lot from the visit. Have a pleasant day.

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  22. Nancy, after reading this post I realised that there is so much I did not know about tin mining!

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    Replies
    1. Phong Hong, the same with me too. Thanks to the one who started this museum!

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Thank you for your visits and encouraging comments. They are greatly appreciated. Have a beautiful day.

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