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Sunday, 31 May 2015

GROWING TARO PLANTS AND ITS HEALTH BENEFITS

Last year in the month of September 2014, I took a few taro corms (small type) from my refrigerator and tried planting them to see if they would grow to yield some corms.
The taro corms are smaller than the local purple yam/taro which is bigger and longer. I love to eat both the small and purple yam. The small taro corms are not always available in the market.
I do not have much space in my garden and the only way I can plant the taro (small type) is in pots. I started off with 4 corms, planted them in 4 medium sized pots but only two were successful. I was not sure whether I would get any taro corms since I planted them in pots.
Two days ago I took one of the pots and slowly and gently remove the plant from the pot, which I have planted 8 months ago. I was mainly curious and was not expecting much when I slowly removed the soil from the base of the plant.
Bit by bit, I scraped the soil away and slowly the corms appeared. I took some photos but it went missing...I really must get this cranky phone to the phone clinic... One by one the corms appeared, I was getting real excited because I didn't expect to get any corm!
These are the corms yielded from one single corm planted in a pot. I am very happy with the yield. I brushed the soil away and leave the corms aside. What a happy surprise for me!
Rinsed clean with water
Taro roots can be cooked in curries, braised meat, deep fried, steamed or in sweet drinks (tong sui in Cantonese). There are many other ways of cooking taro. It can also be used as starch to thicken soup or gravy. It can also be steamed or cooked together with rice.
All cleaned and ready to use or store in refrigerator.

Taro is rich with vitamins and minerals. It is highly nutritious and easily digested. Taro is claimed to detoxify liver and good for liver. Some claimed that it is also good for those suffering from bowel problems e.g. IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), diabetes, regulate blood pressure and blood sugar, and also good for those with heart problem and protects from cancer.
Taro is toxic in the raw state. It can only be eaten when well cooked. If it is not properly cooked, it will cause itchiness in the throat. It has a nutty flavour and every part of the plant can be eaten. So far I have only eaten the corms but not the stem or leaves yet. Peeling taro skin and the sap from the plant will cause skin irritation.
 The land yields its harvest; God, our God, blesses us.

May God bless us still,

so that all the ends of the earth will fear Him.

(Psalm 67:6-7, NIV)

43 comments:

  1. I didn't know any of this. I'm glad you got a great yield on your two plants. That rocks.

    Have a fabulous day. ☺

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    1. Thank you, Sandee. Have a great day!

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  2. I am not familiar with the term taro corms. Are they the ones eaten during moon cake festival? So from one taro corm you now have many taro corms? Well done!

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    1. Hi Mun, I used to call these taro roots but then I learned that they are called corms ha ha... Yes, these are the ones we eat during moon cake festival. I am so happy that with 1 corm I have in return so many corms. Feeling blessed!

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  3. Great post, Nancy, thank you so much for sharing this.

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    1. Linda, you are most welcome. Have a great day!

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  4. Most interesting, you did so well to get so many corms.

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    1. Thank you, Mamasmercantile. Have a great day!

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  5. What a great harvest from just using a pot. I do not think I have ever tried Taro or corms. Enjoy your day!

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    1. Eileen, indeed I am so happy that from 1 taro corm in a pot, it yielded a good harvest. An enjoyable day to you too!

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  6. Very interesting and you have such a great harvest! I see taro roots in many shops here but have never knowingly eaten it ~ yet :-)

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    1. Joyful, maybe you should try it. Then let me know whether you like it or not.

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  7. It is an interesting plant nice have it at home have a nice sunday

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    1. Thank you, Gosia. Have a nice Sunday too!

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  8. I have a few taro plants in my garden too. Planted in the ground and not pots. Last week harvested a few taro and cooked with meat & dried shrimp as a dish. Love it.

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    1. I think growing in ground will yield more. I too like cooking them with meat & dried shrimp as a dish. Just one dish itself will be enough for me.

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  9. Congrats...how long before can harvest...like the sweet potato?

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    1. I think taro should be longer than sweet potatoes.

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    2. The leaves and stem can be eaten?

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    3. Yes, they can be eaten but I have not tried yet....

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  10. Wow! That I must try because I love taro plants both the roots , the stems and the leaves:)

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    1. Joy, I must try the stems and leaves. I only have tasted the roots.

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  11. It's a wonderful plant:) kiss

    http://denimakeup95.blogspot.it/

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    1. Hi De, thank you. Have a pleasant day!

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  12. A very nice yield. Tom The Backroads Traveller

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    1. Thank you, Tom. I am very happy with the yield.

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  13. We have this in my grandparents house, and my grandma always cooks it, we call it "gabi" in visayan dialect.

    www.sarahrizaga.blogspot.com

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Sarah, for sharing about the name in Visayan dialect.

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  14. I wish i have green fingers, can do planting...

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    Replies
    1. Sharon, try planting. Who knows you may have green fingers after all.

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  15. I didn't know any of this. Great harvest from using a pot!
    Thanks for sharing!

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    1. Thank you Arrow, I was indeed surprise by the harvest!

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  16. I think I would Like to try planting taro too. i'm going to plant onions tommorrow. Taro will go next. Thanks for sharing.

    leiangeles.blogspot.com

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    1. Thank you Lei Angeles, for visiting and comments. I too am thinking of planting onions soon. Have a great day!

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  17. You have green thumbs, Nancy.
    Taro cake is familiar here.

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    1. Thanks Lina, I love taro cake too.

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  18. OMG..!!
    thats a huge lot of thing about a simple plant...

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    1. Deeps, this is a great plant and it has many uses!

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  19. Wow what a nice surprise! Can't tell there's a good harvest lurking down there when you look at the plant itself.

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  20. Stacy, it was really a great surprise to have a good harvest.

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  21. I am so excited to see this, Nancy and would love to try it! How big is the pot that you used?

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    Replies
    1. Sharon, I think any medium sized pots will do. Mine is slightly bigger than 1 foot diameter pot.

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Thank you for your visits and encouraging comments. They are greatly appreciated. Have a beautiful day.

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